Superman vol.1 #29 - Cover date July-August 1944
The Prankster sets himself up as The Wizard of Wishes and Superman battles The Tycoon of Crime, the latter of whom looks - with his fat, foolish appearance, comical costume and press-button gadgetry - as though he would have happily fit the mold of other returning villains like the aforementioned Oswald Loomis, Toyman, and Wolfingham. He does use a ferocious intellect to deduce Superman’s sole weakness - well, it’s only hypnotism, which has brought the Man of Steel low before, but it’s still an impressive first outing.
Lois receives her second solo installment, and the issue closes on Clark being erroneously identified as a potential heir to a wealthy Kent, although he muses that he has no relatives (whatever future issues may have to say on the subject).

Superman vol.1 #29 - Cover date July-August 1944

The Prankster sets himself up as The Wizard of Wishes and Superman battles The Tycoon of Crime, the latter of whom looks - with his fat, foolish appearance, comical costume and press-button gadgetry - as though he would have happily fit the mold of other returning villains like the aforementioned Oswald Loomis, Toyman, and Wolfingham. He does use a ferocious intellect to deduce Superman’s sole weakness - well, it’s only hypnotism, which has brought the Man of Steel low before, but it’s still an impressive first outing.

Lois receives her second solo installment, and the issue closes on Clark being erroneously identified as a potential heir to a wealthy Kent, although he muses that he has no relatives (whatever future issues may have to say on the subject).

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The Adventures of Superman Radio Serial - July 1944 to January 1945
The vast majority of these episodes are, like the rest of 1944’s radio serial adventures, missing and considered lost. This is a terrible shame, since two recurring characters are introduced in this six-month period; The terrible, brilliant and horrifically ugly Nazi assassin Der Teufel and Perry White’s comical assistant “Poco”, former court jester from Planet Utopia. 
Luckily, both characters show up again in better-preserved stories further down the line.
The titles of the episodes from this six-month period include:"The Seagull, North Pacific Adventure" (July 1944)"The Mystery of the Aviation Freight Lines" (July 1944)"The Society of the Crimson Robe" (July - August 1944)"Ghosts of the Air" (August 1944)"The Scorpion" (August - September 1944)"Der Teufel’s Atomic Pistol" (September 1944)"The Mystery of the Mummy Case" (September - October 1944)"Dr. Roebling and the Voice Machine" (October - November 1944)"Planet Utopia" (November - December 1944)"Lois’ Phony Uncle John" (December 1944)"The Missing Santa Claus" (December 1944)"The Man in the Velvet Shoes" (December 1944 - January 1945)

The Adventures of Superman Radio Serial - July 1944 to January 1945

The vast majority of these episodes are, like the rest of 1944’s radio serial adventures, missing and considered lost. This is a terrible shame, since two recurring characters are introduced in this six-month period; The terrible, brilliant and horrifically ugly Nazi assassin Der Teufel and Perry White’s comical assistant “Poco”, former court jester from Planet Utopia. 

Luckily, both characters show up again in better-preserved stories further down the line.

The titles of the episodes from this six-month period include:
"The Seagull, North Pacific Adventure" (July 1944)
"The Mystery of the Aviation Freight Lines" (July 1944)
"The Society of the Crimson Robe" (July - August 1944)
"Ghosts of the Air" (August 1944)
"The Scorpion" (August - September 1944)
"Der Teufel’s Atomic Pistol" (September 1944)
"The Mystery of the Mummy Case" (September - October 1944)
"Dr. Roebling and the Voice Machine" (October - November 1944)
"Planet Utopia" (November - December 1944)
"Lois’ Phony Uncle John" (December 1944)
"The Missing Santa Claus" (December 1944)
"The Man in the Velvet Shoes" (December 1944 - January 1945)

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"King Jimmy Olsen" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - July 20, 1944 to October 28, 1944
Probably the first story in which Superman’s trusty pal Jimmy finds himself thrust into some unlikely and fantastic scenario which leads the Man of Steel into action, Jimmy is crowned the king of a super-scientific alien land as part of a scheme by its ruling council to overthrow the monarchy and conquer the world.
The best-known version of Jimmy Olsen - although it was largely contained to Jimmy’s own comic from 1954 through 1974 and rarely reflected in other media - is, of course, the “Jimmy-of-the-week.” Through magic, weird science or pure happenstance, Jimmy would become Elasti-Lad, or The Human Porcupine, or a werewolf, or ancient Rome’s own rock musician, and so on. 
The original Jimmy Olsen of the comics and radio, though, was a tough, resourceful and courageous kid whose brushes with adventure were no more unusual or supernatural than anything that befell the rest of the cast. If his absurd Silver Age adventures have a predecessor, then it’s likely this story … 

"King Jimmy Olsen" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - July 20, 1944 to October 28, 1944

Probably the first story in which Superman’s trusty pal Jimmy finds himself thrust into some unlikely and fantastic scenario which leads the Man of Steel into action, Jimmy is crowned the king of a super-scientific alien land as part of a scheme by its ruling council to overthrow the monarchy and conquer the world.

The best-known version of Jimmy Olsen - although it was largely contained to Jimmy’s own comic from 1954 through 1974 and rarely reflected in other media - is, of course, the “Jimmy-of-the-week.” Through magic, weird science or pure happenstance, Jimmy would become Elasti-Lad, or The Human Porcupine, or a werewolf, or ancient Rome’s own rock musician, and so on. 

The original Jimmy Olsen of the comics and radio, though, was a tough, resourceful and courageous kid whose brushes with adventure were no more unusual or supernatural than anything that befell the rest of the cast. If his absurd Silver Age adventures have a predecessor, then it’s likely this story … 

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Action Comics vol.1 #74 - Cover date July 1944
As this blog takes pains to emphasize, there are trends and motifs which repeat themselves throughout the early years of Superman’s debut; frequently, Superman has had the opportunity to play Guardian Angel to some lovelorn and lackluster poor soul who has, for whatever reason, lost his confidence. It’s not unusual in these circumstances for Superman to adopt the likeness and identity of the underdog in question, performing super-feats disguised as exceptional competence.
However, lovelorn inventor and cool customer Adelbert Dribble turns the tables on the Man of Steel and takes his lovelorn situation into his own hands by not only capturing Superman but taking his place!
Helium-filled muscles and an under-the-cape propeller fill out Adelbert’s ersatz Superman uniform, and honey-trap worthy of Luthor or Ultra - impact-absorbing rubber walls suspended by shock-resistant springs - keep Superman out of sight while Adelbert woos his once dismissive lady love. 
In upcoming years, stories where Superman’s recurring themes are reversed become more common - he’ll lose his powers while someone else will gain them, one of his supporting cast might undertake a secret identity which Clark Kent will pursue to uncover, and so on. Adelbert Dribble reverses Superman’s own do-goodery, however, which is a notable oddity in the overall scheme.

Action Comics vol.1 #74 - Cover date July 1944

As this blog takes pains to emphasize, there are trends and motifs which repeat themselves throughout the early years of Superman’s debut; frequently, Superman has had the opportunity to play Guardian Angel to some lovelorn and lackluster poor soul who has, for whatever reason, lost his confidence. It’s not unusual in these circumstances for Superman to adopt the likeness and identity of the underdog in question, performing super-feats disguised as exceptional competence.

However, lovelorn inventor and cool customer Adelbert Dribble turns the tables on the Man of Steel and takes his lovelorn situation into his own hands by not only capturing Superman but taking his place!

Helium-filled muscles and an under-the-cape propeller fill out Adelbert’s ersatz Superman uniform, and honey-trap worthy of Luthor or Ultra - impact-absorbing rubber walls suspended by shock-resistant springs - keep Superman out of sight while Adelbert woos his once dismissive lady love. 

In upcoming years, stories where Superman’s recurring themes are reversed become more common - he’ll lose his powers while someone else will gain them, one of his supporting cast might undertake a secret identity which Clark Kent will pursue to uncover, and so on. Adelbert Dribble reverses Superman’s own do-goodery, however, which is a notable oddity in the overall scheme.

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World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #14 - Cover date Summer 1944
In the middle of the desert, Hermit Jim is furious that a mining operation is setting up camp next to his claim - and he has a right to be incensed, they’re close to stumbling on his horde of gold, collected over thirty years of prospecting. Superman saves Jim and the gold - and Lois, who gets involved in the mess - from crooks, and reconciles Jim with the miners.
Two or three years ago, however, this story may very well have played out much differently, with a crooked mining camp infringing on the hardworking individual’s rightful land. The setting of Superman has changed noticeably since its fiery days of activism.

World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #14 - Cover date Summer 1944

In the middle of the desert, Hermit Jim is furious that a mining operation is setting up camp next to his claim - and he has a right to be incensed, they’re close to stumbling on his horde of gold, collected over thirty years of prospecting. Superman saves Jim and the gold - and Lois, who gets involved in the mess - from crooks, and reconciles Jim with the miners.

Two or three years ago, however, this story may very well have played out much differently, with a crooked mining camp infringing on the hardworking individual’s rightful land. The setting of Superman has changed noticeably since its fiery days of activism.

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Action Comics vol.1 #73 - Cover date June 1944
What do we know of Clark Kent’s private life? Not much - as a matter of fact, we know very little about his off-camera roles in either identity. We have seen Superman blow off a little steam at his mountain retreat, and more than a few adventures begin with a wandering Clark stumbling across a crime, accident or suicide, so we know he enjoys long strolls. Other than that?
Well, in this issue, a hobby thief engages on a crime wave throughout Metropolis, stealing large and unusual collections and ransoming the back to their owners. Clark sets himself up as bait by planting the information that he collects clocks - and oddly enough, he does. The collection turns out to be a genuine one, so what we now know of Clark (Superman) Kent is that, in his everyday civilian life, he collects clocks...

Action Comics vol.1 #73 - Cover date June 1944

What do we know of Clark Kent’s private life? Not much - as a matter of fact, we know very little about his off-camera roles in either identity. We have seen Superman blow off a little steam at his mountain retreat, and more than a few adventures begin with a wandering Clark stumbling across a crime, accident or suicide, so we know he enjoys long strolls. Other than that?

Well, in this issue, a hobby thief engages on a crime wave throughout Metropolis, stealing large and unusual collections and ransoming the back to their owners. Clark sets himself up as bait by planting the information that he collects clocks - and oddly enough, he does. The collection turns out to be a genuine one, so what we now know of Clark (Superman) Kent is that, in his everyday civilian life, he collects clocks...

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Superman vol.1 #28 - Cover date May-June 1944
J.Wilbur Wolfingham returns to ply his questionable skills as a con man on a town of unsuspecting rubes, only to have it blow up in his face - as always. It’s interesting to look back from this landscape of Superman villains - if you go back to 1942, Superman’s most persistent foes are Luthor, the Scientists of Sudden Death and a panoply of dynamic but short-lived villains. Go back just a year and Superman is facing a cadre of Nazi agents and a few colorful characters. Here, in 1944, he repeatedly locks horns with Toyman, Prankster and old J.Wilbur…
Elsewhere in this issue, Superman saves some ships - both models and real - from treasure-seeking ne’er-do-wells, Lois debuts in her own short-page-count strip, and (reminiscent of last issue’s crossover of Paul Bunyan and the Man of Steel), Superman travels to Ancient Greece and spawns the legend of Hercules (or so the champion fibber at the Liar’s Club gala attests)

Superman vol.1 #28 - Cover date May-June 1944

J.Wilbur Wolfingham returns to ply his questionable skills as a con man on a town of unsuspecting rubes, only to have it blow up in his face - as always. It’s interesting to look back from this landscape of Superman villains - if you go back to 1942, Superman’s most persistent foes are Luthor, the Scientists of Sudden Death and a panoply of dynamic but short-lived villains. Go back just a year and Superman is facing a cadre of Nazi agents and a few colorful characters. Here, in 1944, he repeatedly locks horns with Toyman, Prankster and old J.Wilbur…

Elsewhere in this issue, Superman saves some ships - both models and real - from treasure-seeking ne’er-do-wells, Lois debuts in her own short-page-count strip, and (reminiscent of last issue’s crossover of Paul Bunyan and the Man of Steel), Superman travels to Ancient Greece and spawns the legend of Hercules (or so the champion fibber at the Liar’s Club gala attests)

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Action Comics vol.1 #72 - Cover date May 1944
Superman unearths a typical Nazi sabotage plot only to discover that homegrown saboteurs - and corrupt, corporate ones at that - beat the Axis to the punch. The crooked businessman-as-villain is a rare sight these days, with enemy agents occupying most of Superman’s attention…

Action Comics vol.1 #72 - Cover date May 1944

Superman unearths a typical Nazi sabotage plot only to discover that homegrown saboteurs - and corrupt, corporate ones at that - beat the Axis to the punch. The crooked businessman-as-villain is a rare sight these days, with enemy agents occupying most of Superman’s attention…

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Action Comics vol.1 #71 - Cover date April 1944
It’s an all-romance issue and Jimmy Olsen plays a larger role here than he has anywhere else excepting the radio show. A passel of mixed-up packages confuses affairs between Jimmy, his rival and the object of their mutual affection, while a similar mishap befalls Clark, Lois and Superman. 
Most notably, Clark tries to gain the upper hand in the triangle by gag-gifting Lois with a sarcastic valentine purportedly (and realistically, of course) sent by the Man of Steel, but the package mix-up ends with Lois blaming the bitter Valentine on Clark and becoming even surer of Superman’s affections. Clark doesn’t often end up the sucker in his attempts to knock an arrogant or presumptive peer down a peg or two, but Lois seems immune to his attempts to whittle her down to size.

Action Comics vol.1 #71 - Cover date April 1944

It’s an all-romance issue and Jimmy Olsen plays a larger role here than he has anywhere else excepting the radio show. A passel of mixed-up packages confuses affairs between Jimmy, his rival and the object of their mutual affection, while a similar mishap befalls Clark, Lois and Superman. 

Most notably, Clark tries to gain the upper hand in the triangle by gag-gifting Lois with a sarcastic valentine purportedly (and realistically, of course) sent by the Man of Steel, but the package mix-up ends with Lois blaming the bitter Valentine on Clark and becoming even surer of Superman’s affections. Clark doesn’t often end up the sucker in his attempts to knock an arrogant or presumptive peer down a peg or two, but Lois seems immune to his attempts to whittle her down to size.

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Superman vol.1 #27 - Cover date March-April 1944
Inventiveness is the hallmark of story-telling as Superman (the character) begins rolling up on his sixth anniversary.
Don Cameron seems to be handling all of the writing chores with this issue - To begin with, the Toyman is back, luring Metropolis’ wealthy citizens into an amped-up penny arcade (attractions cost a full DOLLAR) at which he robs and blackmails them. A fairly mediocre story of gangsters threatening the public safety follows, but another gangster story told through diary entries is, at the very least, told from a more interesting perspective.
The second story of the volume, however, involves Superman meeting legendary woodsman and folk hero Paul Bunyan. Although the context of the story is once removed from the reading audience - it’s told by way of a tall tale being spun in Clark and Lois’ presence - it continues the trend of previous imaginary yarns which connected Superman to Cinderella and Santa Claus.

Superman vol.1 #27 - Cover date March-April 1944

Inventiveness is the hallmark of story-telling as Superman (the character) begins rolling up on his sixth anniversary.

Don Cameron seems to be handling all of the writing chores with this issue - To begin with, the Toyman is back, luring Metropolis’ wealthy citizens into an amped-up penny arcade (attractions cost a full DOLLAR) at which he robs and blackmails them. A fairly mediocre story of gangsters threatening the public safety follows, but another gangster story told through diary entries is, at the very least, told from a more interesting perspective.

The second story of the volume, however, involves Superman meeting legendary woodsman and folk hero Paul Bunyan. Although the context of the story is once removed from the reading audience - it’s told by way of a tall tale being spun in Clark and Lois’ presence - it continues the trend of previous imaginary yarns which connected Superman to Cinderella and Santa Claus.

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