28 Plays

"The Space Shell" 
The Adventures of Superman Radio Serial - February 1945

Perry White’s extra-terrestrial personal chef, the “rhymester” and former court jester Poco from the now-destroyed Planet Utopia returns - although his lines, thankfully, are few, far between and mercifully brief. The rhyming gimmick gets old in a rush.

His amazing, transparent Space Shell which transported Poco to Earth in the company of his Terran pals is returned to him by the United States government, who remain thankful for his assistance although they couldn’t replicate the secret fuel formula which allowed the impervious, one-ton bubble to traverse boundless light-years in moments. 

Poco is able to briefly refuel the machine, however, which acts primarily as a vehicle to get the doggerel-fond alien and his pal Jimmy Olsen to the North Pole. There, they team up with a pair of Eskimo siblings to confound a Nazi plot involving exploding icebergs which target Allied transports across the Arctic. 

Superman, of course, helps rout the Nazi plot, although Jimmy (and to give credit where credit is due, Poco, in some small measure) do a pretty decent job of stalling the foreign fascists until the Man of Tomorrow arrives to save the day.

Action Comics vol.1 #81 - Cover date February 1945
It would be interesting to map all of the amusement park “Lands” which populate Metropolis in these early Superman stories, as it’s a not-uncommon go-to premise for the Man of Steel’s adventures. The city must have preceded Orlando for number of attractions.
In this case, wealthy John Nicholas, who grew up an orphan, pledges in his will to use his millions to build Fairyland Isle to entertain children who are poor as he was. His unscrupulous nephews arrange a series of (ideally harmless) accidents to occur at the Park, in order that it’s shut down and the remaining fortune reverts to them, but it all goes awry, the nephews find their virtue, Nicholas turns up alive anyway and the family quartet rededicate themselves as one to promoting Fairyland Isle and similar parks across the world.
A strange interlude in the story occurs when Lois - smoky-eyed and sultry in an elegant emerald green outfit - dons a schoolgirl outfit and convincingly passes for a pre-adolescent (in order to get closer to the story). Amusingly, even Clark is bamboozled by the get-up, which has largely involved nothing more than a change in hairstyle, a change in manner, and -well - a pair of glasses…

Action Comics vol.1 #81 - Cover date February 1945

It would be interesting to map all of the amusement park “Lands” which populate Metropolis in these early Superman stories, as it’s a not-uncommon go-to premise for the Man of Steel’s adventures. The city must have preceded Orlando for number of attractions.

In this case, wealthy John Nicholas, who grew up an orphan, pledges in his will to use his millions to build Fairyland Isle to entertain children who are poor as he was. His unscrupulous nephews arrange a series of (ideally harmless) accidents to occur at the Park, in order that it’s shut down and the remaining fortune reverts to them, but it all goes awry, the nephews find their virtue, Nicholas turns up alive anyway and the family quartet rededicate themselves as one to promoting Fairyland Isle and similar parks across the world.

A strange interlude in the story occurs when Lois - smoky-eyed and sultry in an elegant emerald green outfit - dons a schoolgirl outfit and convincingly passes for a pre-adolescent (in order to get closer to the story). Amusingly, even Clark is bamboozled by the get-up, which has largely involved nothing more than a change in hairstyle, a change in manner, and -well - a pair of glasses…

27 notes

Superman vol.1 #32 - Cover date January-February 1945
Behind one of the most iconic covers of Superman’s lengthy career, the Man of Steel finds himself afflicted with amnesia and left to wander the streets of Metropolis in a vain attempt to discern his own civilian identity. To the credit of his assumed alternate ID, even Superman finds Clark Kent to be too timid and anemic to be Superman’s alter-ego.
Following that, Superman confronts a so-called “Death-Bird” menace at a luxury ski resort, discovering fake ghosts and subversive schemes worthy of a Scooby Doo episode. While Lois dramatically breaks up a pickpocketing ring in her solo adventure, the issue wraps up with Toyman disguising himself as a master toymaker (which is to say, a master toymaker other than one wanted by the police) whose clever inventions allow him entrance to the homes of the wealthiest Metropolitans.
The cover of this issue is striking and finds itself reproduced in homage and merchandise, but it doesn’t tell much of a story - where is Superman that he’s pelted from all sides by electricity? Typically, when the image is expanded upon, it’s the center of fuming storm clouds, but there’s no clue as to context here, merely an affirmation of indestructibility - which is often the appeal of Superman as a character, that he can survive terrific abuse in the pursuit of adventure.

Superman vol.1 #32 - Cover date January-February 1945

Behind one of the most iconic covers of Superman’s lengthy career, the Man of Steel finds himself afflicted with amnesia and left to wander the streets of Metropolis in a vain attempt to discern his own civilian identity. To the credit of his assumed alternate ID, even Superman finds Clark Kent to be too timid and anemic to be Superman’s alter-ego.

Following that, Superman confronts a so-called “Death-Bird” menace at a luxury ski resort, discovering fake ghosts and subversive schemes worthy of a Scooby Doo episode. While Lois dramatically breaks up a pickpocketing ring in her solo adventure, the issue wraps up with Toyman disguising himself as a master toymaker (which is to say, a master toymaker other than one wanted by the police) whose clever inventions allow him entrance to the homes of the wealthiest Metropolitans.

The cover of this issue is striking and finds itself reproduced in homage and merchandise, but it doesn’t tell much of a story - where is Superman that he’s pelted from all sides by electricity? Typically, when the image is expanded upon, it’s the center of fuming storm clouds, but there’s no clue as to context here, merely an affirmation of indestructibility - which is often the appeal of Superman as a character, that he can survive terrific abuse in the pursuit of adventure.

73 notes

72 Plays

"The Mystery of the Sleeping Beauty" 
The Adventures of Superman Radio Serial - January - February 1945

Jimmy and Clark embark on an expedition to find the strange, hidden kingdom of a lost foreign beauty, discovering an isolated tropical empire of wonders which hasn’t known violence for dozens of generations - and is therefore, unfortunately, an easy target for ambitious Japanese soldiers who either seek to conquer the hidden land, or destroy it. 

12 notes

"Superman’s Service for Servicemen Continues"Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - Jan 7 through Feb 25 1945
By September of 1945, the conflicts in Europe and the Pacific Theater will be largely concluded, and so also Superman’s Service for Servicemen - a more-than-year-long story arc in which Superman answers direct requests for assistance sent to him by America’s armed services - winds to a close over the course of the year.
Early in 1945, Superman entertains soldiers stationed in the Aleutian islands by bringing them all the warmth and wonders of a tropical island paradise (including dancing girls), helps along a romantic triangle between a young woman and her two noble beaus stationed overseas, and reminds the folks at home that a soldier’s morale depends on receiving encouraging correspondence from home.
The titles of these arcs are as follows:
"Aleutian Dancing Girls" - January 7, 1945 to January 14, 1945"The War Medals" - January 21, 1945 to February 11, 1945"If You’re Not a Fighter - Be a Writer" - February 18, 1945 to February 25, 1945

"Superman’s Service for Servicemen Continues"
Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - Jan 7 through Feb 25 1945

By September of 1945, the conflicts in Europe and the Pacific Theater will be largely concluded, and so also Superman’s Service for Servicemen - a more-than-year-long story arc in which Superman answers direct requests for assistance sent to him by America’s armed services - winds to a close over the course of the year.

Early in 1945, Superman entertains soldiers stationed in the Aleutian islands by bringing them all the warmth and wonders of a tropical island paradise (including dancing girls), helps along a romantic triangle between a young woman and her two noble beaus stationed overseas, and reminds the folks at home that a soldier’s morale depends on receiving encouraging correspondence from home.

The titles of these arcs are as follows:

"Aleutian Dancing Girls" - January 7, 1945 to January 14, 1945
"The War Medals" - January 21, 1945 to February 11, 1945
"If You’re Not a Fighter - Be a Writer" - February 18, 1945 to February 25, 1945

15 notes

Action Comics vol.1 #80 - Cover date January 1945
Mister Mxyztplk is indeed back and certainly by popular demand, and having appeared in three Superman-related media (both Action and Superman comics, as well as the daily newspaper strip), he effectively completes a triad of recurring comical villains alongside The Prankster and The Toyman, just as the general population of mad scientists is declining notably (including resident nemesis Lex Luthor, whose appearances are less common).

Action Comics vol.1 #80 - Cover date January 1945

Mister Mxyztplk is indeed back and certainly by popular demand, and having appeared in three Superman-related media (both Action and Superman comics, as well as the daily newspaper strip), he effectively completes a triad of recurring comical villains alongside The Prankster and The Toyman, just as the general population of mad scientists is declining notably (including resident nemesis Lex Luthor, whose appearances are less common).

70 notes

World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #16 - Cover date Winter 1944
By way of an unusual framing device, Clark narrates to Lois a Superman anecdote to Lois over dinner, while entertained by a singer belting out a romantic ballad dedicated - despite having nothing apparently to do with The Man of Steel - to Superman. 
This turns out to be one of Superman’s guardian angel turns - he unites starcrossed lovers and sets a would-be songwriter’s career on the right track - but told with an interestingly cinematic conceit relying on flashback to convey the story.

World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #16 - Cover date Winter 1944

By way of an unusual framing device, Clark narrates to Lois a Superman anecdote to Lois over dinner, while entertained by a singer belting out a romantic ballad dedicated - despite having nothing apparently to do with The Man of Steel - to Superman. 

This turns out to be one of Superman’s guardian angel turns - he unites starcrossed lovers and sets a would-be songwriter’s career on the right track - but told with an interestingly cinematic conceit relying on flashback to convey the story.

42 notes

"Bringing in the New Year" Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - December 31, 1944
It’s the end of 1944 and Superman’s Service for Servicemen rings in 1945 with a promise of greatness in the new year and an actual appearance of the New Year’s Baby right in the theater of war…

"Bringing in the New Year" Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - December 31, 1944

It’s the end of 1944 and Superman’s Service for Servicemen rings in 1945 with a promise of greatness in the new year and an actual appearance of the New Year’s Baby right in the theater of war…

22 notes

"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945
Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.
Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).
Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 
Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945

Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.

Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).

Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 

Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

20 notes

Action Comics vol.1 #79 - Cover date December 1944
Dom Cameron returns to the scripting duties for another outing of J.Wilbur Wolfingham, the con-man who can’t seem to con anyone but himself. This is the second of three appearances of Wolfingham in the same year - once each in Action, Superman and World’s Finest. Two of Superman’s other “funny little” villains (Prankster and Toyman) received much cover fanfare in their appearances, and even Superman impersonator Adelbert Dribble showed up on the cover of his single appearance.
This issue marks Wolfingham’s first gracing of a cover, although he doesn’t so much as share it with Superman as much as he imagines Superman’s presence. Still, it’s an important graduation for a solid, recurring villain.

Action Comics vol.1 #79 - Cover date December 1944

Dom Cameron returns to the scripting duties for another outing of J.Wilbur Wolfingham, the con-man who can’t seem to con anyone but himself. This is the second of three appearances of Wolfingham in the same year - once each in Action, Superman and World’s Finest. Two of Superman’s other “funny little” villains (Prankster and Toyman) received much cover fanfare in their appearances, and even Superman impersonator Adelbert Dribble showed up on the cover of his single appearance.

This issue marks Wolfingham’s first gracing of a cover, although he doesn’t so much as share it with Superman as much as he imagines Superman’s presence. Still, it’s an important graduation for a solid, recurring villain.

9 notes