"The Obnoxious Ogies" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - February 12, 1945 to March 31, 1945
The Superman staff is obviously having a great deal of fun with its assorted imps, gremlins, squiffles, pranksters and fibbers, so it’s no surprise that they add the colorful (or color-less, actually) Ogies, a pair of invisible and intangible sprites inherited by Superman thanks to the largesse of a grateful ship’s captain.
As the Ogies are unwilling to leave Superman’s company, the Man of Steel must come up with all sorts of clever plans to mask his dual identity from snooping eyes he can’t even see, and meanwhile must contend with the Ogies’ audible voices causing all sorts of misunderstanding (they fawn over Lois Lane, which the girl reporter mistakes for the otherwise bashful Superman’s own affection given voice), adding new levels of difficulty to his already-complicated life.

"The Obnoxious Ogies"
Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - February 12, 1945 to March 31, 1945

The Superman staff is obviously having a great deal of fun with its assorted imps, gremlins, squiffles, pranksters and fibbers, so it’s no surprise that they add the colorful (or color-less, actually) Ogies, a pair of invisible and intangible sprites inherited by Superman thanks to the largesse of a grateful ship’s captain.

As the Ogies are unwilling to leave Superman’s company, the Man of Steel must come up with all sorts of clever plans to mask his dual identity from snooping eyes he can’t even see, and meanwhile must contend with the Ogies’ audible voices causing all sorts of misunderstanding (they fawn over Lois Lane, which the girl reporter mistakes for the otherwise bashful Superman’s own affection given voice), adding new levels of difficulty to his already-complicated life.

15 notes

"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945
Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.
Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).
Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 
Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945

Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.

Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).

Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 

Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

20 notes

"Superman’s Secret Revealed!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - October 30, 1944 to December 2, 1944
A broken teletype machine in a small-town affiliate of the Daily Planet produces a mangled headline which ties Superman romantically with a recently-engaged heiress. Connecting a handful of dots leads the Planet to reveal Superman’s secret identity as being the heiress’ actual fiancee, an unscrupulous cad who’s marrying to wealthy gal in order to fleece her blind and pay off her gambling debts.
The DNA of the Superman stories is slowly beginning to turn inward, focusing more on plots and problems within the chief supporting cast, particularly here as Superman’s primary goal isn’t so much disabusing the public of the misinformation which the Planet published or saving a young heiress from a predatory fortune-seeker, but saving Lois from the embarrassment of having her scoop exposed as a lie.

"Superman’s Secret Revealed!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - October 30, 1944 to December 2, 1944

A broken teletype machine in a small-town affiliate of the Daily Planet produces a mangled headline which ties Superman romantically with a recently-engaged heiress. Connecting a handful of dots leads the Planet to reveal Superman’s secret identity as being the heiress’ actual fiancee, an unscrupulous cad who’s marrying to wealthy gal in order to fleece her blind and pay off her gambling debts.

The DNA of the Superman stories is slowly beginning to turn inward, focusing more on plots and problems within the chief supporting cast, particularly here as Superman’s primary goal isn’t so much disabusing the public of the misinformation which the Planet published or saving a young heiress from a predatory fortune-seeker, but saving Lois from the embarrassment of having her scoop exposed as a lie.

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"King Jimmy Olsen" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - July 20, 1944 to October 28, 1944
Probably the first story in which Superman’s trusty pal Jimmy finds himself thrust into some unlikely and fantastic scenario which leads the Man of Steel into action, Jimmy is crowned the king of a super-scientific alien land as part of a scheme by its ruling council to overthrow the monarchy and conquer the world.
The best-known version of Jimmy Olsen - although it was largely contained to Jimmy’s own comic from 1954 through 1974 and rarely reflected in other media - is, of course, the “Jimmy-of-the-week.” Through magic, weird science or pure happenstance, Jimmy would become Elasti-Lad, or The Human Porcupine, or a werewolf, or ancient Rome’s own rock musician, and so on. 
The original Jimmy Olsen of the comics and radio, though, was a tough, resourceful and courageous kid whose brushes with adventure were no more unusual or supernatural than anything that befell the rest of the cast. If his absurd Silver Age adventures have a predecessor, then it’s likely this story … 

"King Jimmy Olsen" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - July 20, 1944 to October 28, 1944

Probably the first story in which Superman’s trusty pal Jimmy finds himself thrust into some unlikely and fantastic scenario which leads the Man of Steel into action, Jimmy is crowned the king of a super-scientific alien land as part of a scheme by its ruling council to overthrow the monarchy and conquer the world.

The best-known version of Jimmy Olsen - although it was largely contained to Jimmy’s own comic from 1954 through 1974 and rarely reflected in other media - is, of course, the “Jimmy-of-the-week.” Through magic, weird science or pure happenstance, Jimmy would become Elasti-Lad, or The Human Porcupine, or a werewolf, or ancient Rome’s own rock musician, and so on. 

The original Jimmy Olsen of the comics and radio, though, was a tough, resourceful and courageous kid whose brushes with adventure were no more unusual or supernatural than anything that befell the rest of the cast. If his absurd Silver Age adventures have a predecessor, then it’s likely this story … 

19 notes

"The Mischievous Mr. Mxyzptlk" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - February 21, 1944 to July 19, 1944
It’s the debut of Mister Mxyzptlk (note the early placement of the “T” and “P”) as a puzzling nuisance to both Clark Kent and Superman, mysterious and magical, sly and silly, complicating poor Clark’s efforts to mask his dual identity and coming up with spontaneous dangers to test Superman’s super-prowess. 
However, oddly, the dimension-hopping imp promptly takes a back seat to another unusual menace, a callous and cruel beauty who goes under the unusual moniker of Miss Dreamface and whose incomparable loveliness makes gibbering slaves of men - including even Mxyztplk … and Superman! 
A little Mxyztplk apparently goes a long way, and he’s very soon the most in-demand member of Superman’s rogues gallery.

"The Mischievous Mr. Mxyzptlk"
Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - February 21, 1944 to July 19, 1944

It’s the debut of Mister Mxyzptlk (note the early placement of the “T” and “P”) as a puzzling nuisance to both Clark Kent and Superman, mysterious and magical, sly and silly, complicating poor Clark’s efforts to mask his dual identity and coming up with spontaneous dangers to test Superman’s super-prowess. 

However, oddly, the dimension-hopping imp promptly takes a back seat to another unusual menace, a callous and cruel beauty who goes under the unusual moniker of Miss Dreamface and whose incomparable loveliness makes gibbering slaves of men - including even Mxyztplk … and Superman! 

A little Mxyztplk apparently goes a long way, and he’s very soon the most in-demand member of Superman’s rogues gallery.

"Little Susie’s Fibs" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - November 19, 1943 to February 19, 1944
Preceding the malevolent imp Mxyztplk and peer to Luthor, Toyman and Prankster, mischief being her mantra, here stands one of Superman’s earliest nemeses - Lois Lane’s imaginative niece, Susie. 
Nemesis to the Man of Steel? The goddess of Rhamnous, after whom the term is coined, visited punishment on the prideful, bringing low those whose arrogance had seen them equate themselves with the gods. Even the most secular interpretation of the term suggests a foe against whom the protagonist can find no purchase.
So here’s Susie, a hyper-imaginative child whose inventions of the mind cause no end of trouble for Clark Kent in both of his identities. Susie, who witnesses Superman’s transition into Clark Kent, whose juvenile whims ground the Man of Steel, who cannot be laid low with a punch or a defiant circumvention of some fantastic scientific device. Susie - Superman’s greatest foe?

"Little Susie’s Fibs"
Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - November 19, 1943 to February 19, 1944

Preceding the malevolent imp Mxyztplk and peer to Luthor, Toyman and Prankster, mischief being her mantra, here stands one of Superman’s earliest nemeses - Lois Lane’s imaginative niece, Susie. 

Nemesis to the Man of Steel? The goddess of Rhamnous, after whom the term is coined, visited punishment on the prideful, bringing low those whose arrogance had seen them equate themselves with the gods. Even the most secular interpretation of the term suggests a foe against whom the protagonist can find no purchase.

So here’s Susie, a hyper-imaginative child whose inventions of the mind cause no end of trouble for Clark Kent in both of his identities. Susie, who witnesses Superman’s transition into Clark Kent, whose juvenile whims ground the Man of Steel, who cannot be laid low with a punch or a defiant circumvention of some fantastic scientific device. Susie - Superman’s greatest foe?

"Where is Lois Lane?" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - August 23, 1943 to November 18, 1943
Lois Lane goes missing - or does she? - and Clark Kent is nearly driven to madness attempting to find her. Her apartment is re-rented, the telephone company has no record of her number, and just as suddenly - she’s back - but somehow different! 
The story bears many similarities to the earlier radio serial A Surprise For Superman, the abbreviated final episode of the show’s then-final run, complete with Clark visiting a psychiatrist who nearly convinces the covert Man of Tomorrow that he’s lost his mind. The ultimate resolution - that Lois has been abducted, replaced with a lookalike, and is in the captivity of a pair of innocuous-looking foreign agents - may have been what was originally intended as the conclusion for the source material.

"Where is Lois Lane?"
Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - August 23, 1943 to November 18, 1943

Lois Lane goes missing - or does she? - and Clark Kent is nearly driven to madness attempting to find her. Her apartment is re-rented, the telephone company has no record of her number, and just as suddenly - she’s back - but somehow different! 

The story bears many similarities to the earlier radio serial A Surprise For Superman, the abbreviated final episode of the show’s then-final run, complete with Clark visiting a psychiatrist who nearly convinces the covert Man of Tomorrow that he’s lost his mind. The ultimate resolution - that Lois has been abducted, replaced with a lookalike, and is in the captivity of a pair of innocuous-looking foreign agents - may have been what was originally intended as the conclusion for the source material.

62 notes

"The Sneer Strikes!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - June 28, 1943 to August 21, 1943
More than a few fictional characters toured the Japanese-American internment camps which dotted the west coast after 1942, the goal of their tours largely being to console the uneasy consciences of Americans troubled by the objectionable actions of their government towards literally tens of thousands of their fellow citizens. Clark and Lois visit one camp and - following a superficial tour - find it good, effectively stamping the entire controversial endeavor with Superman’s approval. A low point in Superman’s history. 
Making their judgment call from the tourist perspective, Clark and Lois find the interned citizens of Japanese descent to be “decent, hard-working, honest Americans” … for the most part. Fifth column activities - unsurprisingly, given the circumstances - nonetheless pop up in the camp, necessitating Superman’s intervention.
This time, last year, in the newspaper dailies, Superman was clashing with the insidious Japanese agent The Leer, who destroyed himself rather than risk capture. Now, the Leer is back — or so it seems, as it’s actually the original agent’s lookalike brother, his face also contorted in a permanent rictus.

"The Sneer Strikes!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - June 28, 1943 to August 21, 1943

More than a few fictional characters toured the Japanese-American internment camps which dotted the west coast after 1942, the goal of their tours largely being to console the uneasy consciences of Americans troubled by the objectionable actions of their government towards literally tens of thousands of their fellow citizens. Clark and Lois visit one camp and - following a superficial tour - find it good, effectively stamping the entire controversial endeavor with Superman’s approval. A low point in Superman’s history. 

Making their judgment call from the tourist perspective, Clark and Lois find the interned citizens of Japanese descent to be “decent, hard-working, honest Americans” … for the most part. Fifth column activities - unsurprisingly, given the circumstances - nonetheless pop up in the camp, necessitating Superman’s intervention.

This time, last year, in the newspaper dailies, Superman was clashing with the insidious Japanese agent The Leer, who destroyed himself rather than risk capture. Now, the Leer is back — or so it seems, as it’s actually the original agent’s lookalike brother, his face also contorted in a permanent rictus.

12 notes

"The Nefarious Noname" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - April 19, 1943 to June 26, 1943
Superman has pledged to patrol within America’s borders for fifth columnists and saboteurs, but Clark meanwhile - remember that he had previously tried to enlist in the Army, but been rebuffed - jockeys for the coveted position of overseas war correspondent for the Daily Planet.
Uncovering a spy ring leads Superman to the doorstep of the four-eyed giant Noname. Aligned - for unexplored reasons - with the Axis, the well-dressed titan is also possessed of tremendous mental abilities, and spends a few episodes of the strip rebuffing the Man of Steel behind an impenetrable wall and generally buffeting him about with telekinetic force. 
The unusual character of Noname is never truly explained - where he comes from, from where he derives his amazing powers, whether he’s even human and what a creature of such amazing abilities gains from allying himself with the Axis - but the breakneck demand for new menaces sometimes makes the answers to these questions a luxury …

"The Nefarious Noname"
Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - April 19, 1943 to June 26, 1943

Superman has pledged to patrol within America’s borders for fifth columnists and saboteurs, but Clark meanwhile - remember that he had previously tried to enlist in the Army, but been rebuffed - jockeys for the coveted position of overseas war correspondent for the Daily Planet.

Uncovering a spy ring leads Superman to the doorstep of the four-eyed giant Noname. Aligned - for unexplored reasons - with the Axis, the well-dressed titan is also possessed of tremendous mental abilities, and spends a few episodes of the strip rebuffing the Man of Steel behind an impenetrable wall and generally buffeting him about with telekinetic force. 

The unusual character of Noname is never truly explained - where he comes from, from where he derives his amazing powers, whether he’s even human and what a creature of such amazing abilities gains from allying himself with the Axis - but the breakneck demand for new menaces sometimes makes the answers to these questions a luxury …

27 notes

"The Villainy of the Voice" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 21, 1942 to April 17, 1943
The Man of Steel faces off against, effectively, an invisible man – The Voice, an Axis agent who operates almost exclusively by means of radio broadcasts. The Voice, otherwise unseen – and those who see The Voice, DIE – even makes a sneaky appearance as part of the supporting cast for this arc.
With 1942 wrapping up, you may have noticed a theme running through many of Superman’s newly-minted pseudonymous villains in the daily strips. Here, we meet The Voice, and previously in the daily strip we met The Monocle and The Leer. Seems we narrowly avoided The Mustache, The Glance and The Molar.

"The Villainy of the Voice" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 21, 1942 to April 17, 1943

The Man of Steel faces off against, effectively, an invisible man – The Voice, an Axis agent who operates almost exclusively by means of radio broadcasts. The Voice, otherwise unseen – and those who see The Voice, DIE – even makes a sneaky appearance as part of the supporting cast for this arc.

With 1942 wrapping up, you may have noticed a theme running through many of Superman’s newly-minted pseudonymous villains in the daily strips. Here, we meet The Voice, and previously in the daily strip we met The Monocle and The Leer. Seems we narrowly avoided The Mustache, The Glance and The Molar.

64 notes