"Twenty-Four Hours to Run"Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - November 5, 1939 to December 24, 1939
Having already broken the daily newspaper strip barrier, Superman’s next skyscraper-busting single-bound is into the four-color world of the weekly Sunday strip.
Running a distinct storyline from the six-a-week daily newspaper strip, the Sunday strip bore its own continuity from week-to-week, meaning that while a single plot in the dailies might wrap up in two or three weeks, the Sunday strips would run an arc over the course of several months. This debut story - wherein Superman must protect logger Mike Hensley from his rival’s repeated attempts on his life - runs from the first week of November 1939 through Christmas Eve.
The story abounds with the classic Siegel and Shuster energy of the early strips, written and drawn as it is by the original creators. The workload, however, has officially reached a tipping point and both strips would begin to boast a parade of luminaries working as ghosts to Superman’s original artist.
Paul Cassidy is the first to take up the reins, providing inks and detail work on early strips. Throughout the Forties, a multitude of other artists from Leo Nowak to Jack (Starman) Burnley to, of course, Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye would provide the artwork. 
Tireless Jerry Siegel remains the writer of the strips until drafted in 1943, continuing to forge his singular - if evolving - vision of the Man of Tomorrow.

"Twenty-Four Hours to Run"
Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - November 5, 1939 to December 24, 1939

Having already broken the daily newspaper strip barrier, Superman’s next skyscraper-busting single-bound is into the four-color world of the weekly Sunday strip.

Running a distinct storyline from the six-a-week daily newspaper strip, the Sunday strip bore its own continuity from week-to-week, meaning that while a single plot in the dailies might wrap up in two or three weeks, the Sunday strips would run an arc over the course of several months. This debut story - wherein Superman must protect logger Mike Hensley from his rival’s repeated attempts on his life - runs from the first week of November 1939 through Christmas Eve.

The story abounds with the classic Siegel and Shuster energy of the early strips, written and drawn as it is by the original creators. The workload, however, has officially reached a tipping point and both strips would begin to boast a parade of luminaries working as ghosts to Superman’s original artist.

Paul Cassidy is the first to take up the reins, providing inks and detail work on early strips. Throughout the Forties, a multitude of other artists from Leo Nowak to Jack (Starman) Burnley to, of course, Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye would provide the artwork. 

Tireless Jerry Siegel remains the writer of the strips until drafted in 1943, continuing to forge his singular - if evolving - vision of the Man of Tomorrow.

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