Action Comics vol.1 #18 - Cover date November 1939
Being as Superman is a true representative of fair play, not even Clark Kent’s chosen profession of journalism is immune from the scrutiny of his crusade against injustice. 
In this issue’s adventure, Clark is disgusted and horrified to discover that rival newpaperman Gene Powers will gleefully violate personal trust and individual privacy in order for a sensational story (in this case, Lois and Clark honor a would-be suicide victim’s plea for obscurity, afraid of the terrible shame her attempt at self-destruction would wreak upon her loved ones - the eavesdropping Gene Powers isn’t as kind-hearted and pens a juicy write-up).
More than that, Powers and his publisher Hamilton represent a blackmail ring which uses the paper’s own propensity for yellow journalism - and a scheme involving knock-out gas, a sexy siren and a set-up senator named Hastings - to extort money from prominent public figures. 
In a classic display of the early Superman’s no-holds barred approach to making society safe from the institutions which take advantage of it, the Man of Steel not only runs Gene Powers out of town on a rail and tears up the incriminating staged photos of Senator Hastings, he completely destroys Hamilton’s printing press, putting a permanent end to the paper completely.

Action Comics vol.1 #18 - Cover date November 1939

Being as Superman is a true representative of fair play, not even Clark Kent’s chosen profession of journalism is immune from the scrutiny of his crusade against injustice. 

In this issue’s adventure, Clark is disgusted and horrified to discover that rival newpaperman Gene Powers will gleefully violate personal trust and individual privacy in order for a sensational story (in this case, Lois and Clark honor a would-be suicide victim’s plea for obscurity, afraid of the terrible shame her attempt at self-destruction would wreak upon her loved ones - the eavesdropping Gene Powers isn’t as kind-hearted and pens a juicy write-up).

More than that, Powers and his publisher Hamilton represent a blackmail ring which uses the paper’s own propensity for yellow journalism - and a scheme involving knock-out gas, a sexy siren and a set-up senator named Hastings - to extort money from prominent public figures. 

In a classic display of the early Superman’s no-holds barred approach to making society safe from the institutions which take advantage of it, the Man of Steel not only runs Gene Powers out of town on a rail and tears up the incriminating staged photos of Senator Hastings, he completely destroys Hamilton’s printing press, putting a permanent end to the paper completely.

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