"Superman’s Service for Servicemen Continues"Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - Jan 7 through Feb 25 1945
By September of 1945, the conflicts in Europe and the Pacific Theater will be largely concluded, and so also Superman’s Service for Servicemen - a more-than-year-long story arc in which Superman answers direct requests for assistance sent to him by America’s armed services - winds to a close over the course of the year.
Early in 1945, Superman entertains soldiers stationed in the Aleutian islands by bringing them all the warmth and wonders of a tropical island paradise (including dancing girls), helps along a romantic triangle between a young woman and her two noble beaus stationed overseas, and reminds the folks at home that a soldier’s morale depends on receiving encouraging correspondence from home.
The titles of these arcs are as follows:
"Aleutian Dancing Girls" - January 7, 1945 to January 14, 1945"The War Medals" - January 21, 1945 to February 11, 1945"If You’re Not a Fighter - Be a Writer" - February 18, 1945 to February 25, 1945

"Superman’s Service for Servicemen Continues"
Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - Jan 7 through Feb 25 1945

By September of 1945, the conflicts in Europe and the Pacific Theater will be largely concluded, and so also Superman’s Service for Servicemen - a more-than-year-long story arc in which Superman answers direct requests for assistance sent to him by America’s armed services - winds to a close over the course of the year.

Early in 1945, Superman entertains soldiers stationed in the Aleutian islands by bringing them all the warmth and wonders of a tropical island paradise (including dancing girls), helps along a romantic triangle between a young woman and her two noble beaus stationed overseas, and reminds the folks at home that a soldier’s morale depends on receiving encouraging correspondence from home.

The titles of these arcs are as follows:

"Aleutian Dancing Girls" - January 7, 1945 to January 14, 1945
"The War Medals" - January 21, 1945 to February 11, 1945
"If You’re Not a Fighter - Be a Writer" - February 18, 1945 to February 25, 1945

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Action Comics vol.1 #80 - Cover date January 1945
Mister Mxyztplk is indeed back and certainly by popular demand, and having appeared in three Superman-related media (both Action and Superman comics, as well as the daily newspaper strip), he effectively completes a triad of recurring comical villains alongside The Prankster and The Toyman, just as the general population of mad scientists is declining notably (including resident nemesis Lex Luthor, whose appearances are less common).

Action Comics vol.1 #80 - Cover date January 1945

Mister Mxyztplk is indeed back and certainly by popular demand, and having appeared in three Superman-related media (both Action and Superman comics, as well as the daily newspaper strip), he effectively completes a triad of recurring comical villains alongside The Prankster and The Toyman, just as the general population of mad scientists is declining notably (including resident nemesis Lex Luthor, whose appearances are less common).

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World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #16 - Cover date Winter 1944
By way of an unusual framing device, Clark narrates to Lois a Superman anecdote to Lois over dinner, while entertained by a singer belting out a romantic ballad dedicated - despite having nothing apparently to do with The Man of Steel - to Superman. 
This turns out to be one of Superman’s guardian angel turns - he unites starcrossed lovers and sets a would-be songwriter’s career on the right track - but told with an interestingly cinematic conceit relying on flashback to convey the story.

World’s Finest Comics vol.1 #16 - Cover date Winter 1944

By way of an unusual framing device, Clark narrates to Lois a Superman anecdote to Lois over dinner, while entertained by a singer belting out a romantic ballad dedicated - despite having nothing apparently to do with The Man of Steel - to Superman. 

This turns out to be one of Superman’s guardian angel turns - he unites starcrossed lovers and sets a would-be songwriter’s career on the right track - but told with an interestingly cinematic conceit relying on flashback to convey the story.

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"Bringing in the New Year" Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - December 31, 1944
It’s the end of 1944 and Superman’s Service for Servicemen rings in 1945 with a promise of greatness in the new year and an actual appearance of the New Year’s Baby right in the theater of war…

"Bringing in the New Year" Superman Sunday Newspaper Strip - December 31, 1944

It’s the end of 1944 and Superman’s Service for Servicemen rings in 1945 with a promise of greatness in the new year and an actual appearance of the New Year’s Baby right in the theater of war…

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"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945
Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.
Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).
Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 
Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

"Lois Lane, Millionaire" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - December 4, 1944 to February 10, 1945

Lois Lane stands to inherit a small fortune from her recently deceased great-granduncle, unless an unscrupulous lawyer can take advantage of the strange stipulation - Lois, as the sole heir, if unmarried, has ten days to find a husband.

Superman is, naturally, her first choice, But the Man of Steel’s dogged persistence that Lois should fall for him in his Clark Kent guise leads to the closest near-reveal of his dual identity to date (excluding only his deliberate and misunderstood unmasking in a previous issue of Action).

Superman’s connubial slipperiness leads Lois into the arms of a dashing con man who, ultimately, underlines the problem with anyone pitching woo at Superman’s Girlfriend - who in their right mind wants to get Superman angry at them? 

Of course, Lois fails to inherit the money, but it all works out for the best, and the romantic status quo is reestablished in time for the next adventure.

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Action Comics vol.1 #79 - Cover date December 1944
Dom Cameron returns to the scripting duties for another outing of J.Wilbur Wolfingham, the con-man who can’t seem to con anyone but himself. This is the second of three appearances of Wolfingham in the same year - once each in Action, Superman and World’s Finest. Two of Superman’s other “funny little” villains (Prankster and Toyman) received much cover fanfare in their appearances, and even Superman impersonator Adelbert Dribble showed up on the cover of his single appearance.
This issue marks Wolfingham’s first gracing of a cover, although he doesn’t so much as share it with Superman as much as he imagines Superman’s presence. Still, it’s an important graduation for a solid, recurring villain.

Action Comics vol.1 #79 - Cover date December 1944

Dom Cameron returns to the scripting duties for another outing of J.Wilbur Wolfingham, the con-man who can’t seem to con anyone but himself. This is the second of three appearances of Wolfingham in the same year - once each in Action, Superman and World’s Finest. Two of Superman’s other “funny little” villains (Prankster and Toyman) received much cover fanfare in their appearances, and even Superman impersonator Adelbert Dribble showed up on the cover of his single appearance.

This issue marks Wolfingham’s first gracing of a cover, although he doesn’t so much as share it with Superman as much as he imagines Superman’s presence. Still, it’s an important graduation for a solid, recurring villain.

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Superman vol.1 #31 - Cover date November-December 1944
Luthor’s been a rare sight in this book lately, but he returns with the power of SOUND (i.e. super-destructive tuning forks) now added to his arsenal of anti-Superman weapons. 
Lois continues to appear in her slate of stand-alone, shorter features which bear some resemblance to the comic strip in their lightly comic touch (although she gets to do her fair share of actual investigative reporting), and a final story in this volume involves Superman assisting a natural history museum with its attempts to build a valuable stock of displays in spite of efforts at sabotage.
Most interesting story in this volume, however, involves a tale told from the perspective of Lois Lane’s heretofore unseen pooch Flip - the only creature on Earth to know Superman’s dual identity! We all change our clothes in front of the dog, I suppose. Regaling his pup pals with the story of his derring-do alongside the Man of Steel, Flip’s story is another example of the book’s attempts to find new and curious perspectives from which to tell the ‘same old’ crimefighting stories which are its current bread and butter.

Superman vol.1 #31 - Cover date November-December 1944

Luthor’s been a rare sight in this book lately, but he returns with the power of SOUND (i.e. super-destructive tuning forks) now added to his arsenal of anti-Superman weapons. 

Lois continues to appear in her slate of stand-alone, shorter features which bear some resemblance to the comic strip in their lightly comic touch (although she gets to do her fair share of actual investigative reporting), and a final story in this volume involves Superman assisting a natural history museum with its attempts to build a valuable stock of displays in spite of efforts at sabotage.

Most interesting story in this volume, however, involves a tale told from the perspective of Lois Lane’s heretofore unseen pooch Flip - the only creature on Earth to know Superman’s dual identity! We all change our clothes in front of the dog, I suppose. Regaling his pup pals with the story of his derring-do alongside the Man of Steel, Flip’s story is another example of the book’s attempts to find new and curious perspectives from which to tell the ‘same old’ crimefighting stories which are its current bread and butter.

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Action Comics vol.1 #78 - Cover date November 1944
In this very unusual story - scripted by Alvin Schwartz, a writer of whom it might also fairly be said was an unusual man - Superman befriends the owner of a diner in the bohemian part of Metropolis, a colorful Russian character named Sergei who trades sandwiches and soup for artwork from his eccentric clientele, charges on a sliding scale, and deliberately keeps customers out so he never has to rush his cooking. We have similar places here in Seattle. 
Alvin Schwartz was an important figure in Superman’s history - a prolific contributor, he wrote Superman and Batman’s first teamup in World’s Finest and the first adult Bizarro story (Bizarro had debuted in an Otto Binder story for Superboy) complete with now-trademark speech patterns. Conflicts with editor Mort Weisinger drove Schwartz away from comics.
A deeply intelligent man, Schwartz had a temperament which made him an excellent fit for superhero comics - he was profoundly interested in Jungian psychoanalysis, Eastern mysticism, Wilhelm Reich’s theories of Orgone Energy, to name only a few of his many sidelines.
Following his departure from the comics, Schwartz claimed to have “met” Superman - or the tulpa of Superman, the idea of the character given physical form - in the very quotidian environment of a New York taxi cab.

Action Comics vol.1 #78 - Cover date November 1944

In this very unusual story - scripted by Alvin Schwartz, a writer of whom it might also fairly be said was an unusual man - Superman befriends the owner of a diner in the bohemian part of Metropolis, a colorful Russian character named Sergei who trades sandwiches and soup for artwork from his eccentric clientele, charges on a sliding scale, and deliberately keeps customers out so he never has to rush his cooking. We have similar places here in Seattle. 

Alvin Schwartz was an important figure in Superman’s history - a prolific contributor, he wrote Superman and Batman’s first teamup in World’s Finest and the first adult Bizarro story (Bizarro had debuted in an Otto Binder story for Superboy) complete with now-trademark speech patterns. Conflicts with editor Mort Weisinger drove Schwartz away from comics.

A deeply intelligent man, Schwartz had a temperament which made him an excellent fit for superhero comics - he was profoundly interested in Jungian psychoanalysis, Eastern mysticism, Wilhelm Reich’s theories of Orgone Energy, to name only a few of his many sidelines.

Following his departure from the comics, Schwartz claimed to have “met” Superman - or the tulpa of Superman, the idea of the character given physical form - in the very quotidian environment of a New York taxi cab.

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"Superman’s Secret Revealed!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - October 30, 1944 to December 2, 1944
A broken teletype machine in a small-town affiliate of the Daily Planet produces a mangled headline which ties Superman romantically with a recently-engaged heiress. Connecting a handful of dots leads the Planet to reveal Superman’s secret identity as being the heiress’ actual fiancee, an unscrupulous cad who’s marrying to wealthy gal in order to fleece her blind and pay off her gambling debts.
The DNA of the Superman stories is slowly beginning to turn inward, focusing more on plots and problems within the chief supporting cast, particularly here as Superman’s primary goal isn’t so much disabusing the public of the misinformation which the Planet published or saving a young heiress from a predatory fortune-seeker, but saving Lois from the embarrassment of having her scoop exposed as a lie.

"Superman’s Secret Revealed!" Superman Daily Newspaper Strip - October 30, 1944 to December 2, 1944

A broken teletype machine in a small-town affiliate of the Daily Planet produces a mangled headline which ties Superman romantically with a recently-engaged heiress. Connecting a handful of dots leads the Planet to reveal Superman’s secret identity as being the heiress’ actual fiancee, an unscrupulous cad who’s marrying to wealthy gal in order to fleece her blind and pay off her gambling debts.

The DNA of the Superman stories is slowly beginning to turn inward, focusing more on plots and problems within the chief supporting cast, particularly here as Superman’s primary goal isn’t so much disabusing the public of the misinformation which the Planet published or saving a young heiress from a predatory fortune-seeker, but saving Lois from the embarrassment of having her scoop exposed as a lie.

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Action Comics vol.1 #77 - Cover date October 1944
The Prankster returns once again with an inspired scheme to use faked newspaper headlines to manipulate the buying and selling of entire empires. It’s the second time the Prankster’s plan has involved the Daily Planet in some capacity, which of course quickly brings him to the attention of Superman.
The cover to this issue famously declares “Another Superman versus Prankster adventure” in a banner below the title, as a nod to the popularity of the funny little villain and his repeated schemes to baffle, insult and embarrass the Man of Tomorrow.

Action Comics vol.1 #77 - Cover date October 1944

The Prankster returns once again with an inspired scheme to use faked newspaper headlines to manipulate the buying and selling of entire empires. It’s the second time the Prankster’s plan has involved the Daily Planet in some capacity, which of course quickly brings him to the attention of Superman.

The cover to this issue famously declares “Another Superman versus Prankster adventure” in a banner below the title, as a nod to the popularity of the funny little villain and his repeated schemes to baffle, insult and embarrass the Man of Tomorrow.

42 notes